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Light bulbs produce EMF through four different means, depending on the design. Light bulb EMF comes from radiofrequency (RF) emissions (WiFi, Bluetooth), dirty electricity, and magnetic fields.


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The RF sources you get from smart bulbs and magnetic fields are produced by all bulbs but are more prominent in those with a ballast, such as compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs), or circuitry, such as with light-emitting diode bulbs (LEDs). So, how do we reduce EMF from light bulbs in our homes?

When searching out the best light bulbs for reducing EMF, you might be very surprised to find out what you should be looking for: Incandescent bulbs. That’s right, good old-fashioned filament incandescent bulbs.

But, wait, aren’t incandescent bulbs evil and need to be eradicated (looking at you, Al Gore)? Indeed, there has been a global phase-out of incandescent bulbs and they are getting harder to find, with a few hold-out manufacturers for consumers and some that make commercial bulbs.

The US started its phase-out in 2007 and most of the EU started doing away with them in 2009. Most of the other countries in the world started to follow suit in 2014.

Incandescents are being phased out not because they are unsafe or produce pollutants, but simply because of their energy usage. If we developed fusion power tomorrow and had limitless energy, incandescent bulbs would not be such a big deal.

With the whole global warming thing and its associated political machinations, incandescents are seen as increasing electricity demand, thus driving the increased burning of coal (which is mostly what we use to make electricity), and resulting in more carbon dioxide emissions.

That being said, one way to address those issues (which some of us don’t buy, but that’s outside the subject of this article) is to reduce overall energy demand. Other technologies for lighting offered those reductions, so out with incandescents.

But, that’s OK. We have CFLs!

CFLs are much, much more energy-efficient, green and healthy for the planet, except that they contain mercury (eh, not too green) and produce EMF. For all you non-chemistry folks, proper mercury amalgam fillings in your teeth are just fine but drinking or breathing mercury vapors is bad, super bad, and also really, really bad.

Comparison Table

IMAGE PRODUCT
EDITOR’S CHOICE
1. Sylvania DoubleLife 100W

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 72
  • Lifespan: 2000 hours
Check Price
2. Satco S3929 100W

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 100
  • Lifespan: 5000 hours
  • Coated glass
Check Price
3. Dysmio 100W

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 100
  • Lifespan: unknown
  • Coated glass
Check Price
4. Bulbrite A19 102100

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 30/70/100
  • Lifespan: 2500 hours
  • Three-way bulb
Check Price
5. SUNLITE 75W 75A/FR/RS

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 75
  • Lifespan: 2000 hours
  • Shatter-proof coating
Check Price
6. Havells 00378 75W

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 75
  • Lifespan: 5000 hours
Check Price
7. CEC Industries #100A-19

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 100
  • Lifespan: unknown
Check Price
8. General Electric 75W H&PC 63866 41032 41030

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 75
  • Lifespan: unknown
Check Price

Every time the kids roughhouse in the living room and knock over the lamp and bust that CFL bulb, mercury vapor is released into the room. A serious amount of mercury vapor.

Everyone gets poisoned. You might be able to take it fairly well (Hey, not to worry. Cancer is years and years away), but the kids and the dog or cat get a much bigger dose.

It all has to do with surface area to volume ratios and a bunch of boring toxicology stuff, but trust us, it’s not good for them. Also, when you break one of these – show of hands – how many of you carefully clean the area on all surfaces while wearing latex gloves, then deposit the paper towels and broken bulb into a zip lock bag, then take it to either a responsible hardware retailer or your local sewerage treatment plant?

You see, both of those places have mercury reclamation programs so that people don’t just toss them in the… oh, you just toss them out? Well, those that are sent to landfills, then the mercury goes to groundwater, then eventually your tap… you get the picture.

OK, the heck with CFLs, we have LED bulbs now! They are more energy-efficient than CFLs and do not contain harmful chemicals, but… both CFLs and LEDs put out lots and lots of EMF.

So, we are back to square one with incandescent bulbs, which produce very little dirty electricity because they are basically similar to the wiring already in your walls. There are several independent sellers of specialty long-lasting incandescent bulbs such as those made by Bulborama and LongLife, but here we will list those remaining bulbs on the market that you can still buy through online retailers.

Our Best Low EMF Lightbulb Reviews and Comparisons

1. Satco S3929 100W

Product Highlights

The Satco S3929 is a 100W incandescent bulb with a standard A19 shape and an E26 Edison base for use in household lamps and other regular fixtures. The bulb puts out 960 lumens, which is low for a 100W bulb but there are other features that make the bulb unique.

This is a rough service bulb with a shatterproof coating that is intended for use in industrial situations but will still work in your home. The service life of the Satco S3929 is rated at 5000 hours, which is about 5x what you see in a standard incandescent bulb.

Features

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 100
  • Lifespan: 5000 hours
  • Coated glass

What We Like About Satco S3929 100W

Many users purchase these Satco bulbs for use in shops and garages. The filaments are vibration-resistant and do not flicker on moving equipment, such as garage door openers. One good thing about Satco bulbs: they are incandescent bulbs that are still made.

What We Don’t Like About Satco S3929 100W

The shatterproof coating reduces the light output slightly from incandescent bulbs of similar wattage (typical 100W incandescent bulbs put out around 1700 lumens). Some users have reported failures after 20 hours of use.

PROS

  • Affordable
  • Shatter-proof
  • Fits a standard socket

CONS

  • Not as bright as comparable bulbs
  • Some failures after a short time of use

2. Dysmio 100W

Product Highlights

Dysmio 100W incandescent bulbs are standard A19 bulbs on an Edison (E26) base and can be used in household fixtures or in outdoor or shop conditions. That is because they are rough service bulbs with a shatterproof coating.

Dysmio 100W bulbs produce 1190 lumens, closer to the light output of traditional 100W incandescents.

Features

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 100
  • Lifespan: unknown
  • Coated glass

What We Like About Dysmio 100W

Dysmio bulbs are brighter than other shatter-proof bulbs. There really is not a need for a shatter-proof bulb in your living room under most conditions (unless you have really wild kids), but with the incandescent bulb phase-out, regular light bulbs are getting harder and harder to find.

Many users have purchased them for terrariums and reptile vivariums as heat lamps.

What We Don’t Like About Dysmio 100W

There are no lifespan ratings provided by Dysmio and there is no information on these bulbs on their corporate website. Many users report bulb failures after a month of use.

The only remaining incandescents on the Dysmio site are 25W party bulbs in several colors, which indicates that they no longer manufacture the 100W bulbs. They are now selling off stock, so get them while you can.

PROS

  • Shatter-proof coating
  • Great price
  • Brighter than other coated bulbs
  • Comes in packs of 4 or 8

CONS

  • No burn hours reported by Dysmio
  • Bulbs are no longer made

3. Bulbrite A19 102100

Product Highlights

Bulbrite A19 incandescent bulbs are your basic, traditional soft white frosted light bulb, just like you used to be able to get them. As the name says, they are an A19 shape and they have a regular E26 Edison base.

In addition, these are 3-way bulbs intended for table lamps and can be set to 30, 70, or 100 Watts with a maximum light output of 1050 lumens.

Features

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 30/70/100
  • Lifespan: 2500 hours
  • Three-way bulb

What We Like About Bulbrite A19 102100

The Bulbrite incandescent is one of the few 3-way bulbs out there that you can still purchase using a regular E26 base and A19 shape. There are other bulbs available on the market, but nearly all are A21, will not fit American fixtures reliably, and are intended for the also-dwindling European market. In general, users are very satisfied with these bulbs.

What We Don’t Like About Bulbrite A19 102100

Several customers report that many Bulbrite bulbs they received did not work, requiring re-orders. Mostly, a few of the filaments failed, leaving customers with a 1-way bulb. Also, packing does not adequately protect the bulbs from breakage during shipping.

PROS

  • One of the few 3-way bulbs out there
  • Affordable price

CONS

  • Bulbs arrive broken due to packaging
  • Filament failures

4. SUNLITE 75W 75A/FR/RS

Product Highlights

The SUNLITE 75A is a 75W incandescent A19 bulb with an E26 Edison base rated as a rough service bulb since it is covered with a shatterproof coating. The bulb is actually a General Electric product (their Survivor line), but since GE now only makes LED bulbs, these are marketed through SUNLITE.

The SUNLITE 75A produces 740 lumens and has an estimated 2000 hour burn time (longer if used in a 60W socket, where it will produce 562 lumens of light and last 5400 hours).

Features

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 75
  • Lifespan: 2000 hours
  • Shatter-proof coating

What We Like About SUNLITE 75W 75A/FR/RS

Reviews by users mainly report employing this bulb in industrial settings where LED bulbs will not function due to hot conditions. The SUNLITE bulbs are apparently very durable, hold up well in less than ideal environments, and produce good consistent light.

What We Don’t Like About SUNLITE 75W 75A/FR/RS

Despite the affordability of the bulbs, several users complain about the shipping costs, which equal the purchase price of the bulbs themselves.

PROS

  • Very affordable
  • Rough service bulb
  • Long service life

CONS

  • Shipping costs are high, despite being shipped out from the US

5. Havells 00378 75W

Product Highlights

The Havells 00378 is a 75W incandescent bulb in the A19 shape with an Edison (E26) base. The bulbs are intended for general use lighting, put out about 650 lumens of light, and are rated to last about 5000 hours of use.

These are as close to regular old light bulbs that you will find out there, but Havells has absolutely no information about them on their corporate page. This means they are no longer manufactured and are selling off stock, so get them while you can.

Features

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 75
  • Lifespan: 5000 hours

What We Like About Havells 00378 75W

For regular-looking incandescent light bulbs, these bulbs have an outstanding lifespan. Your typical incandescents in the 75-100-Watt range that you pick up at the store typically lasted about 1000-2500 hours of use.

These bulbs are nearly twice as durable.

What We Don’t Like About Havells 00378 75W

The only negative we could find about the Havells bulbs is that soon, there will be no more.

PROS

  • Affordable
  • Long service life
  • Standard household indoor or outdoor bulb

CONS

  • The remaining supplies are limited

6. CEC Industries #100A-19

Product Highlights

CEC Industries #100A-19 incandescent bulbs are another offering of standard E26 base, A19-shaped light bulbs for household use, indoors or outdoors. They are less expensive per bulb than the other bulbs on this list.

Service life is not reported but is likely an average of approximately 2000 hours like other similar incandescents. Lumen output is also not reported, but likely to be around 1100 lumens.

Features

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 100
  • Lifespan: unknown

What We Like About CEC Industries #100A-19

These are your basic household light bulbs and are priced below what you can currently find on the market.

What We Don’t Like About CEC Industries #100A-19

The only downside to these bulbs is that CEC Industries has no current information on the corporate webpage, only a similar 60W red party bulb. This is an indication that they too are getting out of the household incandescent business. Supplies will be limited.

PROS

  • Cheapest incandescents around
  • Standard shape for lamps and fixtures
  • Indoor or outdoor use

CONS

  • No longer made and supplies are limited

7. General Electric 75W H&PC 63866 41032 41030

Product Highlights

The GE H&PC is a halogen incandescent bulb with a standard E26 Edison base and A19 shape. These are the halogen version of GE’s original Soft White series and produce 1170 lumens of light, which is a lot for a 75W bulb.

Although unreported, you can expect about 1500-2000 hours of life from these bulbs.

Features

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 75
  • Lifespan: unknown

What We Like About General Electric 75W H&PC 63866 41032 41030

Many anti-CFL advocates love these bulbs and claim that their light quality is quite superior to LED bulbs as well. Some users who suffered from headaches with newer light bulbs reported tremendous changes and improvement after switching to the GE halogens.

What We Don’t Like About General Electric 75W H&PC 63866 41032 41030

GE provides no details about these bulbs regarding their lifespan. In fact, there are no details about these or any other incandescent household bulbs on their corporate webpage, which is replete with many offerings of LED bulbs. Basically, GE has also gotten out of the incandescent bulb game so they are currently selling off all their incandescent bulb stock.

PROS

  • Great price (less in bulk)
  • Quality light (2800 K)
  • No EMF headaches

CONS

  • GE is selling off the last of these bulbs right now

8. Sylvania DoubleLife 100W

Product Highlights

Aah, here you go. Last but not least, Sylvania Soft White Halogens (their DOUBLElife line) is an improved version of the venerable Sylvania household light bulb. In a regular A19 shape and set on an E26 Edison base, these bulbs are perfect in chandeliers, wall sconces, lamps, or to light up your porch. DOUBLElife bulbs last about 2000 hours.

They are a “100W” equivalent that only uses 72W with enhanced light output because they are halogen bulbs (1280 lumens). In an age where regulators are trying desperately to kill off the last incandescent manufacturers, Sylvania has managed to stay in the game and provide a great light bulb.

You can buy them anywhere, but they are illegal in California.

Features

  • Shape: A19
  • Base: E26
  • Wattage: 72
  • Lifespan: 2000 hours

What We Like About Sylvania DoubleLife 100W

Be grateful there is still some sanity out there and Sylvania has held the course. Sylvania actually has product information about these bulbs on their corporate website, which means they are still making them!

These bulbs produce excellent light at 2800 K and are dimmable. If you want genuine light bulbs, these are the real deal. The price per bulb is also the cheapest you can get at about $2.50-$3.00 per bulb.

What We Don’t Like About Sylvania DoubleLife 100W

For many users, the bulb failure rate is as high as 50%. Some bulbs arrived broken due to ineffective packaging.

PROS

  • Very affordable
  • Great light quality
  • Energy-efficient incandescents
  • Long service life

CONS

  • Some quality issues
  • Issues with packaging no protecting bulbs during shipping

FINAL VERDICT

Our final take-home conclusion is to go with Sylvania, a long-time manufacturer of quality lighting products for over 100 years. The brand was re-birthed in 1993 through a merger with OSRAM, a German company, which was then split from OSRAM by its new parent company, LEDVANCE, in 2017.

LEDVANCE is a Chinese lighting industry consortium and seeks to stabilize and extend the Sylvania brand name for years to come. For many American homes of days gone by, the bulbs in your house were either GE or Sylvania.

Sylvania Soft White bulbs were the standard living room lamp light bulb in the majority of American homes. Their newer offering (let’s hope they keep offering them) of a halogen version that puts out a “100W” equivalent but only uses 72 Watts is fantastic.

The light quality is excellent, reduces eye strain, and is also ideal for artists and photographers. Sylvania engineering expertise has also developed a DOUBLElife version of the bulbs that last about 2000-2500 hours, which is also great and a big cost saving.

All that being said, you cannot go wrong with Sylvania bulbs.